Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon – Iain Provan – NIV Application Commentary

NIV Application Commentary Ecclesiastes Song of SolomonIain Provan is the author of the Ecclesiastes/Song of Solomon volume in the NIV Application Commentary series.

In alignment with the vision of the NIVAC series, Provan combines sound biblical exegesis with helpful insight into application.

Pastors who are teaching and preaching through these books will find this volume especially helpful.

Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs have always presented particular challenges to their readers, especially if those readers are seeking to understand them as part of Christian Scripture.

Ecclesiastes regularly challenges the reader as to grammar and syntax.

The interpretation even of words which occur frequently in the book is often unclear and a matter of dispute, partly because there is frequent word-play in the course of the argument.

The argument is itself complex and sometimes puzzling and has often provoked the charge of inconsistency or outright self-contradiction.

When considered in the larger context of the OT, Ecclesiastes stands out as an unusual book, whose connection with the main stream of biblical tradition seems tenuous.

We find ourselves apparently reading about the meaninglessness of life and the certainty of death in a universe in which God is certainly present but is distant and somewhat uninvolved.

When considered in the context of the NT, the dissonance between Ecclesiastes and its scriptural context seems even greater; for if there is one thing that we do not find in this book, it is the joy of resurrection. Perhaps this is one reason why Ecclesiastes is seldom read or preached on in modern churches.

The Song of Songs (also known as the Song of Solomon) has been read, historically, by Christians, in two primary ways―as a text which concerns the love and sexual intimacy of human beings and as a text which uses the language of human love and intimacy to speak of something else―the relationship between Christ and the church.

Christians have often felt that they must choose between these options―that a text about human love and sexual intimacy could not be at the same time a spiritual text.

Iain Provan (PhD, Cambridge University) is Marshall Sheppard Professor of Biblical Studies at Regent College. An ordained minister of the Church of Scotland, he is the author of commentaries on Lamentations and 1 and 2 Kings. [1]

Get this book on Amazon via its exact ISBN: Song of Solomon/Ecclesiastes – Iain Provan

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[1] Summary text provided by the publisher.