Amillennial Commentaries on Revelation

Commentaries on Revelation that reflect the theology of amillennialism are listed below. Amillennialism in Christian eschatology, i.e. the study of the future, is the teaching that there is no literal 1,000-year earthly reign of Jesus Christ forthcoming. Rather, Revelation 20:1-10 describes the symbolic reign of Christ that is occurring today in the world. In Christian theology, amillennialism is often contrasted with premillenialism and postmillennialism. Amillennialism has a rich tradition in Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches as well as in many Protestant denominations such as Lutheranism, Presbyterianism, and Methodism.

The commentary list below is intended to be a helpful guide, not necessarily the final word. Expert reviews of these commentaries, as well as information about the intended audience, can be found on the page Best Commentaries on Revelation, which lists volumes from a variety of theological perspectives.



Revelation Commentaries from the Perspective of Amillennialism



The Book of Revelation (New International Greek Testament Commentary) by G.K. Beale


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From the publisher: “At a time when the study of Greek is curtailed in many schools of theology, we hope that the NIGTC will demonstrate the continuing value of studying the Greek New Testament… the volumes of the NIGTC are for students who want something less technical than a full-scale critical commentary… the supreme aim of this series is to serve those who are engaged in the ministry of the Word of God and thus glorify God’s name.” See more about the New International Greek Testament Commentary series.



The Revelation to John: A Commentary on the Greek Text of the Apocalypse by Stephen S. Smalley


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From the publisher: “The Revelation to John by Stephen Smalley is a magisterial interpretation of John’s Apocalypse as a grand drama, which can only be properly understood in light of John’s Gospel and letters and in the context of the Johannine community. As such, it offers the reader a significantly different approach to this enigmatic text than that offered by most contemporary commentaries. Working directly from the Greek text, Smalley offers a masterful analysis of the critical and literary dimensions of the Apocalypse for students and scholars alike.”



Triumph of the Lamb: A Commentary on Revelation by Dennis E. Johnson


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From the publisher: Dennis E. Johnson deftly guides us through questions about how to interpret Revelation, what it meant to its original audience, and how it equips us today. He explains that Revelation fortifies the church against the Enemy’s wiles by disclosing the profound paradoxes of Christ’s victory and glory. The central themes of Revelation converge with Christ’s triumph over the Enemy.”



Revelation (Reformed Expositional Commentary) by Richard D. Phillips


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From the publisher: The REC series has “four fundamental commitments. First, these commentaries aim to be biblical…Second, these commentaries are unashamedly doctrinal…Third, these commentaries are redemptive-historical…Fourth, these commentaries are practical…” All authors are “pastor-scholars.” See more about the Reformed Expository Commentary series.



Revelation (Tyndale New Testament Commentary) by Leon L. Morris


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From the publisher: This series is “designed to help readers understand what the Bible actually says and what it means…[each commentary] examines the text section by section, drawing out its main themes. It also comments on individual verses and deals with problems of interpretation. The aim throughout is to get at the true meaning of the Bible and to make its message plain to readers today.” See more about the Tyndale New Testament Commentary series.



The Message of Revelation (The Bible Speaks Today) by Michael Wilcock


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From the publisher: The “the three distinctives of The Bible Speaks Today series are (1) “BST authors are committed to a serious study of the text in its own integrity,” (2) that “expositors should not be antiquarians, living only in the remote past” but suggest application for living, and (3) “each book is intended to be both readable in style and manageable in size.” See more about the Bible Speaks Today commentary series.



Exposition of the Book of Revelation by Simon Kistemaker


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From the publisher: “Created specifically for pastors and serious bible students, a comprehensive look into the book of Revelation offers outlines, fresh translations, exposition and application, critical notes on the Greek texts, and chapter summaries.”



Revelation (Black’s New Testament Commentary) by Ian Boxall


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From the publisher: “Dr Boxall includes excurses tackling subjects such as numerology, the number of the beast and the Millennium. Here is a contemporary commentary which brings fresh understanding to a most controversial book in the Bible.”



Revelation (Continental) by Jurgen Roloff


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From the publisher: “Is Revelation, with its strangeness and idiosyncratic theology, a legitimate expression of the gospel? To this question, raised by the book’s conflicting history of influence, Jurgen Roloff is able to answer yes. Viewing Revelation as a lively interaction between the author and concrete communities of faith, Roloff maintains that the book’s epistolary framework is the chief starting point for interpreting its prophetic message and bizarre apocalyptic images. After an informative introduction that focuses on the book’s literary characteristics, historical context, and interpretive problems, Roloff explores each successive unit of the text under the following headings: text: fresh translation; form: literary Gattung, structure, and function; and commentary: verse-by-verse discussion of the text in its original context. The commentary also includes several helpful excursuses that explore specific issues related to a particular unit of the text.”



Other Resources on Amillennialism



The Time Is At Hand by Jay Adams


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About the author: “Jay E. Adams (PhD, University of Missouri) is a former director of advanced studies and professor of practical theology at Westminster Theological Seminary, as well as a retired pastor. He has written over fifty books on pastoral ministry, preaching, counseling, Bible study, and Christian living. His books include Competent to Counsel, The Christian Counselor’s Manual, and Marriage, Divorce, and Remarriage in the Bible.”



More Than Conquerors: An Interpretation of the Book of Revelation by William Hendriksen


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From the publisher: “With an uninterrupted printing history since it was first published in 1939, this classic interpretation of the book of Revelation has served as a solid resource and source of inspiration for generations. Using sound principles of interpretation, William Hendriksen unfolds the mysteries of the apocalypse gradually, always with the purpose of showing that “we are more than conquerors through Christ.” Both beginning and advanced students of the Scriptures will find here the inspiration to face a restless and confusing world with a joyful, confident spirit, secure in the knowledge that God reigns and is coming again soon. This edition features a newly designed interior layout.”



The Pauline Eschatology by Geerhardus Vos


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About the author: “Theologian, author, and long-time Professor of Biblical Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary, Geerhardus Johannes Vos was born in March, 1862 at Heerenveen, Netherlands. A prolific author, Vos’s published writings include articles, essays, reviews, poems, and biblical-theological studies on both Old and New Testament topics.”



Also see:

Revelation commentaries for pastors