Best Matthew Commentaries | Reviews for Bible Study, Preaching, and Teaching

Is it time for you to take your understanding of the Gospel of Matthew to the next level? Learning and absorbing insights about the life and ministry of Jesus Christ from Matthew is worth your time and effort. Bible commentaries on Matthew can help you understand and apply the important New Testament book.

Bible commentaries on Matthew can help you understand its message and apply it to your life. For a full list with helpful reviews see below, but here is a quick glance of the Top 3 Commentaries on Matthew:

Top 3 Commentaries on the Book of Matthew
Matthew by D.A. CarsonMatthew (REBC) by D.A. Carson (link goes to Amazon using exact ISBN); combining exegetical insight and theological reflection, this is one the best evangelical Bible commentaries ever written; the target audience for this commentary is pastors but well-read lay people would benefit.
Matthew by R.T. FranceMatthew (NICNT) by R.T. France (link goes to Amazon using exact ISBN); loaded with exegetical and theological analysis that not only informs but edifies; France is a brilliant commentator whose writing isn’t overly academic and wooden, but beautiful and vibrant at times.
Matthew by Donald HagnarMatthew (WBC) by Donald Hagner (link goes to Amazon using exact ISBN); two-volume, in-depth commentary on the Greek text of Matthew, which offers explanations that pastors will find helpful.
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The Bible instructs Christians to seek wisdom (Prov. 1:7, James 1:5) and who better to learn from than pastors, theologians, and professors who have been studying and teaching Matthew for decades?

10 Best Matthew Commentaries

The best Matthew commentaries are listed below. There are exegetical commentaries, scholarly and technical commentaries, as well as commentaries that are easy to understand. They are not suggested as a replacement for prayer, the Holy Spirit, and the reader’s own diligent study of Scripture. The “Top 10” list is based on aggregate academic reviews.

Please use the list below as a starting point for learning about Matthew commentaries. It is not intended to be the “final word” because of its limitations. Nevertheless, a list based on aggregate reviews is likely to point you in the right direction to find the right resource for your purposes.

#1

Matthew
Expositor’s Bible Commentary Revised
by D.A. Carson

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Matthew commentary by D.A. Carson
The hardback volume also includes the EBC commentary on Mark

Summary: Based on aggregate reviews, D.A. Carson’s Matthew volume in the Expositor’s Bible Commentary series is the most well-reviewed commentary on the Gospel. It is a mid-level commentary. Readers don’t need to know Greek to utilize it.

Carson updated his 1984 edition with this 2010 revision. Though not afraid to dive deeply into textual, historical, or theological matters, Carson has pastors in mind when he writes.

Author: Carson is one of the leading evangelical theologians of the late 20th and early 21st century. He is Reformed, non-dispensational, and has a high view of Scripture. Carson, who is now retired, taught at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School.

Carson is well-known for his John commentary in the Pillar series, which is considered one the best John commentaries available today. Carson is also the editor for the Pillar series.

Reviews from Academic Journals

Journal of the Evangelical Theology Society (subscription required)
“… a veritbale gold mine of information for research, preaching and teaching… here is a scholar who knows his material, weighs the options carefully, and offers judicious conclusions as a genuine believer.”
Trinity Journal (subscription required)
“This is, in most areas, the commentary on Matthew for which evangelicals have been waiting for the last thirty years or more… a first-rate commentary, sound in scholarship, sensitive in discussion of areas of controversy, clear in expression, uncompromising in loyalty to the Word of God, and eminently usable by the ‘expositor’ for whom the series is designed.” (R.T. France)

Reviews from Pastors and Professors

Thomas Schreiner
“clear first choice for pastors”
Desiring God (ministry of John Piper)
#1 recommended commentary on Matthew
Keith Mathison (Ligonier Ministries)
“Carson’s work is characterized by careful and sane exegesis and consideration of all interpretive options”

Series: The publisher notes that the REBC series “is that of a scholarly evangelicalism committed to the divine inspiration, complete trustworthiness, and full authority of the Bible.”

See more about the Expositor’s Bible Commentary series, original and revised.

Please also see Best Commentary Series: The Top 50. Based on aggregate reviews.

#2

The Gospel of Matthew
New International Commentary on the New Testament
by R. T. France

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Matthew commentary by R.T. France
France’s Matthew commentary is 1,233 pages in length

Summary: R.T. France’s Matthew commentary in the NICNT series is one of the most-well reviewed volumes in of the most well-reviewed commentary series. This commentary was highly anticipated for years. Many reviewers said it was worth the wait.

For many pastors and teachers, it’s hard to choose between Carson and France for best Matthew commentary.

With the 2007 publication of this volume, France expands his volume on Matthew in the TNTC series, which was published in 1985 (see the volume below). However, this volume isn’t merely an update, but a substantially new commentary.

Author: France was an evangelical who affiliated with the Anglican church and taught at Oxford University. He served on the NIV translation committee. Fried died in 2012.

France’s Mark volume in the NIGTC series is considered one of the best Mark commentaries available today.

Reviews from Academic Journals

Bibliotheca sacra (subscription required)
“This may be the best amillennial commentary on Matthew currently available… his writing style is truly captivating… [France] is a first-class Gospels scholar…”
Journal of the Evangelical Theology Society (subscription required)
“France has made this a commentary on Matthew, not a commentary on commentaries on Matthew… His work should be warmly appreciate, and his example of focusing on textual exegesis rather than peripheral matters should be followed by all those who do scholarly biblical exegesis for the benefit of Christ’s church.”

Reviews from Pastors and Professors

D.A. Carson (links to Amazon)
a “best buy” on Matthew, “Judicious, well-written, and informed, this is likely to become a standard work on Matthew for some time to come”
Keith Mathison (Ligonier Ministries)
“France’s work is thorough and solidly evangelical and will be beneficial to pastors and all serious students of Scripture”

Series: The publisher notes that the NICNT series aims “to provide earnest students of the New Testament with an exposition that is thorough and abreast of modern scholarship and at the same time loyal to the Scriptures as the infallible Word of God.”

See more about the New International Commentary on the New Testament series.

After browsing the commentaries below, also see the best one-volume bible commentaries, based on aggregate reviews.

#3

Matthew 1-13 and 14-28
Word Biblical Commentary
by Donald A. Hagner

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Matthew commentary by Donald Hagner
Hagner also wrote Encountering the Book of Hebrews

Summary: This two-volume Matthew commentary is designed for pastors and professors. It is a mid-level commentary that those with working knowledge of Greek will maximize. Others, too, will benefit on the whole, but perhaps not in every part.

Volume one is 407 pages in length and was published in 1993. Volume two is 527 pages in length and was published in 1995. The second volume has slightly better reviews on aggregate, but if a reader enjoys one volume they will likely enjoy both.

This commentary won the ECPA Gold Medallion Award for Best Commentary in 1996.

Author: Hagner is ordained in the United Presbyterian church. He taught for many years at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California.

Hagner revised the Romans volumes in the EBC series. Please see best Romans commentaries for more.

Reviews from Academic Journals

Journal of the Evangelical Theology Society (subscription required)
“…even when one disagress with Hagner’s conclusions one must admire his discussion of the evidence and his weighing of the competing viewpoints… the WBC format have been utilized by Hagner to write what is perhaps the finest evangelical commentary on Matthew in terms of detailed exegetical discussion… deserves a wide readship.”
Trinity Journal (subscription required)
“…will stand as one of the premier commentaries on Matthew for years to come… will prove to be a benchmark for other works on the gospel… the student of Matthew cannot afford to be without this work… thorough, well written, and clearly organized… the student or pastor seeking to understand a passage in Matthew’s gospel would do well to begin with what Hagner has written.”

Reviews from Pastors and Professors

Thomas Schreiner
“helpful commentary on the Greek text”
Denver Seminary (Craig Blomberg, etal)
a “priority” commentary on Matthew

Series: The publisher notes that the WBC series “delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation.” See more about the Word Biblical Commentary series.

#4

A Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew
by Craig S. Keener

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This edition is out of print so it is not available on Christian Book, but Keener has written other Matthew commentaries – see below.

Matthew commentary by Craig Keener
This cover is of the hardcopy edition published in 1999.

Summary: Craig Keener is a prolific commentary author and his Matthew volumes are well-reviewed. At almost 1,000 pages, this volume is more academic and extensive than his Matthew commentary in the IVPNTC commentary series (see below).

This volume includes information helpful to pastors, but the IVPNTC edition (pub. 1997) provides more. Keener revised this 2000 edition in 2009 and it is part of Ben Witherington’s Socio-Rhetorical Commentary series (see below).

The original hardcopy edition is out of print, which is why it’s often relatively expensive on secondary markets.

Author: Keener teaches at Asbury Theological Seminary. He is Arminian and evangelical. He is well-known for his Revelation commentary in the NIVAC series, which is considered one of the best Revelation commentaries.

Reviews from Academic Journals

Themelios (subscription required)
“Keener has produced a distinctive and valuable and insightful commentary. With its abundant references to ancient literature and secondary literature, it can only be described as a remarkable tour de force. Solidly evangelical, deeply thoughtful, always informed and eminently practical, this is a commentary that will faithfully lead readers to the heart of Matthew.”
Presbyterion (subscription required)
“…it displays massive erudition… Keener is an exceptionally clear writer, capable of expressing the fruits of his research in non-technical terms.”

Reviews from Pastors and Professors

D.A. Carson (links to Amazon)
a “best buy” on Matthew; “sets new standards… it is engagingly written and always has the preacher and teacher in mind”
Denver Seminary (Craig Blomberg, etal)
a “priority” commentary on Matthew

Volume: The publisher notes that “Keener focuses on two aspects of the interpretation of Matthew. First, he analyzes the social-historical-rhetorical contexts of both Matthew and his traditions. Second, he examines the nature of Matthew’s exhortations to his Christian audience pericope by pericope.”

#5

Matthew
New American Commentary
by Craig L. Blomberg

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Matthew commentary by Craig Blomberg
This commentary is 461 pages in length

Summary: Blomberg’s commentary is best described in his own words from the preface: “The most important consideration in the theological exposition of a Gospel is to determine what a given Evangelist wants to stress.” Chapter by chapter, verse by verse, this is the conviction Blomberg fleshes out in this volume.

Interview: Read Best Bible Commentaries seven-question interview with Craig Blomberg on this volume

Author: Blomberg teaches at Denver Seminary, which is Baptist. He wrote 1 Corinthians in the NIVAC series, which is considered one of the best 1 Corinthians commentaries, and James in the ZECNT series, which is considered one of the best James commentaries.

Reviews from Academic Journals

Themelios (subscription required)
“Blomberg’s commentary is solidly evangelical, well-informed, and judicious in its conclusions… it is clear that the author is an exegete, and a good one… he helps “the reader understand what the text says” and “provides pastoral wisdom” “…filled with solid, informative exegesis… especially appealing to pastors and lay teachers” (Donald Hagner)

Reviews from Pastors and Professors

Thomas Schreiner
“helpful commentary for pastors”
D.A. Carson (links to Amazon)
“equally good in detail and in the flow of the argument”

Series: The publisher notes that this series “has been designed primarily to enable pastors, teachers, and students to read the Bible with clarity and proclaim it with power.” See more about the New American Commentary series.

#6

Matthew
Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament
by Grant R. Osborne

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Matthew commentary by Grant Osborne
This commentary is 1,154 pages in length

Summary: Osborne has a well-earned reputation for being an outstanding exegete on New Testament books. The acclaimed ZECNT format showcases the breadth of Osborne’s scholarly gifts, as he navigates exegetical, theological, and application sections with equal skill and helpfulness to the reader.

Author: Osborne, who died in 2018, was Arminian. He served on the NLT translation committee. Osborne’s doctoral advisor was the prestigious biblical scholar, I. Howard Marshall.

Osborne is well-known for his Revelation volume in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament series, which is considered one of the best Revelation commentaries.

Reviews from Academic Journals

Review of Biblical Literature (subscription required)
“Osborne avoids a forced choice (more common in older works) between history and theology; he reads Matthew as theologically motivated history.” “…offers a moderately conservative outlook, but Osborne remains generous and ready to interact with a range of positions… scholars working on Matthew’s Gospel cannot afford to neglect this important addition to research on this Gospel.” (Craig Keener)
Themelios (subscription required)
“Overall, the pastor who makes this one of the main commentaries in sermon preparation will not be disappointed, and in this it seems Osbrone’s volume accomplishes its goal… a notable achievement and will indeed serve its educated-pastoral purpose well in many ways. I would recommend it a one to have on any pastor’s shelf as they study and proclaim the Gospel from the First Gospel.”

Reviews from Pastors and Professors

Denver Seminary (Craig Blomberg, etal)
a “priority” commentary on Matthew

Series: The publisher notes that the ZECNT series “was refined over time by an editorial board who listened to pastors and teachers express what they wanted to see in a commentary series based on the Greek text.”

See more about the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament series.

#7

Matthew
International Critical Commentary
by W. D. Davies and Dale C. Allison

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These volumes were published from 1988-1997

Summary: The unabridged edition of this commentary consists of three dark green, hardback volumes. The abridged edition of this commentary consists of three pink, softcover volumes. The unabridged in technical; the abridged is mid-level.

Commonly, new hardback volumes cost well over $100 each, sometimes closer to $150 each new. Abridged volumes are commonly $60-$70 each new. Each three-volume series is over 2,300 pages in total length.

Author: The authors take a critical approach to Scripture. Davies was a Congregationalist, a Reformed pastor, and was an early proponent of The New Perspective on Paul. He died in 2001. Allison teaches at Princeton Theological Seminary.

Reviews from Academic Journals

Review of Biblical Literature (subscription required)
“The style of the commentary is largely descriptive, its perspective moderately critical… Readers will generally gain a good understadning of the basic issues of interpretation of the individual pericopes as they work through each section… for beginning students and busy ministers.” (Refers to the abridged edition.)

Reviews from Pastors and Professors

Thomas Schreiner
recommended, “massive and technical Greek commentary” (refers to unabridged version)
Keith Mathison (Ligonier Ministries)
#5 commentary on Matthew; “the work of Davies and Allison is indispensable” (refers to unabridged version)

Series: The publisher notes that the ICC series has “sought to bring together all the relevant aids to exegesis, linguistic and textual no less than archaeological, historical, literary and theological to help the reader.”

#8

The Gospel According to Matthew
Pillar New Testament Commentary
by Leon Morris

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Matthew commentary by Leon Morris

Reviews and Accolades:

• Keith Mathison: #4 commentary on Matthew, “one should not neglect the work of Leon Morris”

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Morris takes an evangelical in approach to Scripture. He was an evangelical, affiliating with the Anglican church (d. 2006). 

This commentary is best for expository preachers, Bible college and seminary students, church elders and teachers, and experienced Bible readers. This volume combines exegetical and preaching insights.

Morris is well-known for his Romans commentary in the same series.

The publisher notes that the PNTC series combines “rigorous exegesis and exposition, with an eye alert both to biblical theology and the contemporary relevance of the Bible.” See more about the Pillar New Testament Commentary series.

#9

Matthew
Tyndale New Testament Commentary
by R.T. France

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Matthew commentary by R.T. France

Reviews and Accolades:

• Tom Schreiner: recommended, “a shorter treatment that is helpful”

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: France takes an evangelical in approach to Scripture. He was an evangelical and affiliated with the Anglican church (d. 2012). France served on the NIV translation committee.

With this volume, France updated and expanded his Matthew volume in the NICNT series (see above).

France is well known for writing the Mark volume in the New International Greek Testament Commentary series, which is considered one of the best Mark commentaries available.

The publisher notes that the TNTC series is “designed to help readers understand what the Bible actually says and what it means…[each commentary] examines the text section by section, drawing out its main themes.”

See more about the Tyndale New Testament Commentary series.

#10

Matthew
Teach the Text Commentary Series
by Jeannine K. Brown

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Matthew commentary by Jeannine Brown

Reviews and Accolades:

• Craig Blomberg, etal: a “priority” commentary on Matthew

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Brown takes an evangelical in approach to Scripture. She teaches at a Baptist seminary. Brown serves on the NIV translation committee.

This commentary is best for pastors, individual study, Bible studies, and adult Sunday school classes. The volume combines interpretation and application.

The publisher notes that this series utilizes “the best of biblical scholarship” and provides “the information a pastor needs to communicate the text effectively.” See more about the Teach the Text series.

10 More Gospel of Matthew Commentaries for Christian Ministry

Please read: Why are the Gospel of Matthew commentaries below not in the “Top 10”? It’s not because they have received poor reviews or because people haven’t found them helpful. The reasons vary:

  • Some are relatively new and haven’t been widely reviewed, read, or used yet.
  • Others haven’t been widely distributed, so it is difficult to get enough information to aggregate.
  • Still others may be outdated in relation to biblical scholarship or out of print and difficult to acquire.

The “Top 10” list is reviewed annually. Readers are encouraged to consider the volumes in this section before making a purchase. These 10 are not in any particular order.


Matthew
New Cambridge Bible Commentary
by Craig A. Evans

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Matthew commentary by Craig Evans

Reviews and Accolades:

• Craig Blomberg, etal: a “priority” commentary on Matthew

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Evans graduated from a Baptist seminary and teaches at a Houston Baptist University.

This commentary is best for expository preachers, Bible college and seminary students, church elders and teachers, and experienced Bible readers. Pastors will find this volume helpful, but scholars and college students even more so.

The publisher notes that the NCBC series does not “assume the reader has a great deal of specialized theological knowledge or an impressive command of the Hebrew, Aramaic, or biblical Greek.”


Matthew
Hermeneia
by Ulrich Luz

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Matthew commentary by Ulrich Luz

Reviews and Accolades:

• Tom Schreiner: recommended, “a careful and massive commentary”

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: This volume is best for readers who can follow a technical Greek commentary. It was translated from four volumes in German to three volumes in English. Luz published these volumes over a 20-year period.

The publisher notes the Hermeneia series “has a rich background in the history of biblical interpretation as a term for the detailed, systematic exposition of a scriptural work.”


Matthew
NIV Application Commentary
by Michael J. Wilkins

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Matthew commentary by Michael Wilkins

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Wilkins takes an evangelical in approach to Scripture. He is ordained in the EFCA denomination. Wilkins teaches at BIOLA University. He specializes in New Testament theology, Christology, and discipleship.

This commentary is best for expository preachers, Bible college and seminary students, church elders and teachers, and experienced Bible readers. This volume is much larger than others in the NIVAC series at over 1,000 pages.

The publisher notes that the goal of the NIVAC series “is to help you with the difficult but vital task of bringing an ancient message into a modern context.”

See more about the NIV Application Commentary series.


Matthew
Reformed Expositional Commentary
by Daniel M. Doriani

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Matthew commentary by Daniel Doriani

Interview: Read Best Bible Commentaries seven-question interview with Daniel M. Doriani on this volume

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Doriani takes an evangelical approach to Scripture. He is Reformed. Doriani teaches at Covenant Seminary.

This commentary is best for pastors, individual study, devotional reading, Bible studies, and adult Sunday school classes. This volume, like others in this series, read like sermons.

Doriani also wrote the 1 Peter commentary in this series.

The publisher notes that the REC series has four commitments. “First, these commentaries aim to be biblical… unashamedly doctrinal… redemptive-historical… [and] practical…” See more about the Reformed Expository Commentary series.


Matthew
Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament
by David L. Turner

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Matthew commentary by David Turner

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Turner takes an evangelical approach to Scripture. He is a progressive dispensationalist.1 Turner teaches at Cornerstone University.

This commentary is best for readers who can follow a technical Greek commentary.

The publisher notes that BECNT series aims “to provide, within the framework of informed evangelical thought, commentaries that blend scholarly depth with readability, exegetical detail with sensitivity to the whole, and attention to critical problems with theological awareness.”

See more about the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament series.


Matthew
Concordia Commentary
by Jefferey Gibbs

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Matthew commentary by Jefferey Gibbs

Theology, Audience, Purpose: Gibbs takes an evangelical approach to Scripture. He is evangelical and Lutheran. While not technical, the volumes in the Concordia Commentary series reflect seminary-level scholarship.

The target audience is pastors, professors, and teachers.

According to the publisher, authors in the Concordia series “fully affirms the divine inspiration, inerrancy, and authority of Scripture as it emphasizes ‘that which promotes Christ’ in each pericope.”


Matthew: The Christbook
by Frederick Dale Bruner

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Matthew commentary by Frederick Dale Bruner

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Bruner is Reformed. He taught at Whitworth College. This commentary is best for expository preachers, Bible college and seminary students, church elders and teachers, and experienced Bible readers.

This commentary consists of two volumes and is theologically focused. This commentary is not part of series.

The publisher notes that in this commentary “Bruner asks both what Matthew’s Gospel said to its first hearers and what it says to readers today.”


Matthew
Brazos Theological Commentary
by Stanley Hauerwas

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Matthew commentary by Stanley Hauerwas

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Hauerwas identifies as a member of the evangelical left.

This commentary is best for expository preachers, Bible college and seminary students, church elders and teachers, and experienced Bible readers.

This volume, like others in the series, employs a systematic theologian to write an exposition.


The Gospel of Matthew
Socio-Rhetorical Bible Commentary
by Craig S. Keener

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Matthew commentary by Craig Keener

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Keener takes an evangelical in approach to Scripture. He is Arminian. Keener has multiple Matthew commentaries (see above and below).

This commentary is best for expository preachers, Bible college and seminary students, church elders and teachers, and experienced Bible readers.

Keener also wrote the 1-2 Corinthians commentary in the NCBC series, which is considered one of the best 1-2 Corinthians commentaries.

The publisher notes that the SRC series interprets Scripture “within the context of the world in which it was written and read.”


Matthew
IVP New Testament Commentary
by Craig S. Keener

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Matthew commentary by Craig Keener

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Keener takes an evangelical in approach to Scripture. He is Arminian. Keener has multiple Matthew commentaries (see above).

This commentary is best for expository preachers, Bible college and seminary students, church elders and teachers, and experienced Bible readers. This volume is probably the most pastor-friendly of Keener’s Matthew commentaries.

He also wrote the Galatians commentary in NCBC series, which is known as one of the best Galatians commentaries available today.

The publisher notes that the IVPNTC series is for “preachers, teachers, students and other individuals who want to dig deep into the heart of the New Testament.” See more about the IVP New Testament Commentary series.


Matthew
Understanding the Bible Commentary Series
by Robert Mounce

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Matthew commentary by Robert Mounce

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Mounce takes an evangelical approach to Scripture. He was on the NIV, NLT, and ESV translation committees (d. 2019).

His son is New Testament scholar, William Mounce, who is know for his 1-2 Timothy and Titus commentary in the WBC series.

This commentary is best for expository preachers, Bible college and seminary students, church elders and teachers, and experienced Bible readers.

The publisher notes that volumes in the UBCS series “breaks down the barriers between the ancient and modern worlds so that the power and meaning of the biblical texts become transparent to contemporary readers.”

See more about the Understanding the Bible Commentary Series.


The Gospel of Matthew
The New International Greek Testament Commentary
by John Nolland

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Matthew commentary by John Nolland

Theology, Audience, and Purpose: Nolland is an Anglican priest. He is Tutor in New Testament at Trinity College in Bristol, England. This commentary is best for readers who can follow a technical Greek commentary.

Nolland wrote the Luke commentary in the WBC series, which is considered one of the best Luke commentaries.

About the NIGTC series, the publisher notes, “at a time when the study of Greek is curtailed in many schools of theology, we hope that the NIGTC will demonstrate the continuing value of studying the Greek New Testament.”

See more about the New International Greek Testament Commentary series.


Classic Matthew Commentaries

Matthew
Ironside Expository Commentaries
by H.A. Ironside

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Matthew commentary by H.A. Ironside

Synopsis: Regarding theology, Ironside pastored Moody Church in Chicago, Illinois, and helped popularize dispensationalism in the early 20th century.

This commentary is best for individual study, devotional reading, Bible studies, and adult Sunday school classes.

The publisher notes that H.A. Ironside (1876-1951) “was an internationally acclaimed Bible teacher and preacher, as well as the author of more than sixty books.”


Matthew
Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture
edited by Manlio Simonetti

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Matthew commentary

Synopsis: This commentary is best for expository preachers, Bible college and seminary students, church elders and teachers, and experienced Bible readers.

The publisher notes that “the vast array of writings from the church fathers — including much that is available only in the ancient languages — have been combed for their comment on Scripture.

Each portion of commentary has been chosen for its salient insight, its rhetorical power, and its faithful representation of the consensual exegesis of the early church.”


Also see:

Compare 75 different commentary series on the Bible Commentary Series Comparison Chart

Footnotes:

  1. All dispensationalists view the dispensations as chronologically successive. Progressive dispensationalists, in addition to viewing the dispensations as chronologically successive, also view the dispensations as progressive stages in salvation history.

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