Cambridge Bible Commentary | Reviews, Theology, Pictures

Cambridge Bible CommentaryThe Cambridge Bible Commentary Series is based on the New English Bible designed for use in schools and training colleges, and for the layman.

It replaces the old Cambridge Bible for Schools. Each volume will comment on one book, or two or three short books, of the Bible, beginning with the New Testament, already published.

In each the text will be given in full.

Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page.

Great care is being taken to see that the commentary is suitable to the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references, but the commentary does convey the latest and best scholarship.

The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults.

Volumes in the series

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Genesis 1-11 – Robert Davidson

Chapters 1-11 of Genesis are like a poetic prologue to the early history of the Jewish people and to their religion. For Christianity also they later fulfil a similar purpose. Professor Davidson takes these chapters as a separate unity, comments on them, and explains their religious significance and their place in the Bible as a whole. Introductory sections on the sources and purpose of the book, and the meaning of myth, lead straight into the text and commentary which alternate with each other in the style of the series.

Genesis 12-50 – Robert Davidson

Chapters 12-50 of the book of Genesis may be considered as enshrining the patriarchal traditions of the Jewish people. Besides the elements of poetry and legend embodied in these traditions, Professor Davidson shows that there can be a historical basis for the narratives and offers guidelines for exploring it. The Genesis stories cannot simply be seen as a reading back into earlier times of the background to the social customs and religious outlook of their later editors. Introductory sections deal with the sources, historicity and general characteristics of the narratives, and are followed by a section-by-section presentation of the text with commentary in the established style of the series.

Exodus – Ronald E. Clements

Dr Clements’ volume, like others in the series, contains the text in the New English Bible translation, divided into sections, with introductory material preceding, and a commentary directly following each section of the text. Dr Clements discusses the content and historical background of the book, and the theories about the authorship of Exodus, identifying briefly the four main sources. Although the content of Exodus is largely devoted to the narrative of the escape of the Israelites from Egypt, Dr Clements treats the book as a truly religious work, in which history and faith are inseparably woven together.

Leviticus – J. R. Porter

The book of Leviticus originally formed part of a larger whole comprising what are now the first four or five books of the Old Testament. Its name is descriptive – ‘the Levitical book’ being about the personnel of the temple, all of whom were supposed to be descended from Levi. In one way the description is accurate, since the material was produced among the priesthood which had survived the fall of Judah to the Babylonians in 587 BC as a manual of instruction for its members. However, since priests in Israel gradually emerged as leaders of the nation, the book of Leviticus is also directed at the laity and, by the promulgation of laws set in a historical narrative, intended to instruct them in their religious and civil obligations.

Numbers – John Sturdy

Like the other Cambridge Bible Commentary volumes, this contains an introduction followed by the texts of the N.E.B. translation divided into sections. Each section of the text is followed by the commentary upon it. Mr Surdy discusses the the content, structure and authorship of the book, pointing to material from two distinct periods: 500-400 BC and some 500 years earlier.

Deuteronomy – Anthony Phillips

Dr Phillips’s volume, like the others in the series, contains the text in the NEB translation, with introductory material preceding it, and a commentary directly following each section of text. Dr Phillips explains the nature and function of the whole book, its place in Jewish religious history and thought, and among the Old Testament books, and its continuing relevance today.

Joshua – J. Maxwell Miller and Gene M. Tucker

The Cambridge Bible Commentary gives the full text in the N.E.B. version, with a lucid untechnical commentary designed for students in schools and colleges, for ministers of religion, and laymen generally. The volume is meant to be read as an uninterrupted unity, with introductory sections leading straight into the text, which is itself interwoven with the commentary. The central theme of Joshua is the acquisition of the land of Canaan by the people of Israel under the leadership of Joshua, the successor of Moses.

Judges – James D. Martin

The Book of Judges forms part of that section of the Old Testament known as the ‘Historical Books’. These books are theological interpretations of history, the word of God revealed in the events of Israel’s past. The Book of Judges describes the continuing attempts of the Israelites to settle in central Palestine in the period between 1250 and 1000 BC and consists of a series of stories about individual judges who, in the earlier period of settlement, as military leaders, saved the people in attacks by hostile neighbors and in the later period of settlement became judicial figures of considerable importance. In his introductory section Dr Martin tries to discern the objective truths behind the theological interpretations of historical events; he also discusses the original form of the book, its chronology, multiple authorship, sources, and the nature and role of the judges. In the established style of the series the N.E.B. translation of the text then follows, divided into brief sections and alternating with passages of commentary. The results of recent Old Testament scholarship and modern theological thought are conveyed in simple language to the student and layman.

1 Samuel – Peter R. Ackroyd

Professor Ackroyd’s introduction summarizes the place of the First Book of Samuel in the Old Testament canon, its relationship with history and its theological purpose. The main divisions of the text are those provided by the New English Bible itself, but the text is further subdivided for the purposes of the commentary, which draws out the kind of significance indicated in the introduction. As in the series of Cambridge Bible Commentaries on the New English Bible New Testament, short passages of text and the editor’s commentary are interspersed so that the reader does not have to refer to another part of the book to find the commentary. A final brief section asks what is the theological message today of this account of the beginnings of the line of David, of Samuel’s role as judge and of Saul’s as king.

2 Samuel – Peter R. Ackroyd

Like the other volumes of the Cambridge Bible Commentary, this contains an introduction followed by the text of the New English Bible divided into sections. Each section of the text is followed by the commentary upon it. The Second Book of Samuel tells how David took full control of both the northern and southern Hebrew kingdoms and consolidated his power throughout the region. Professor Ackroyd’s commentary concentrates on interpretation rather than historical reconstruction, and part of his introduction dealing with the theological significance of the Books of Samuel relates the religious tradition stemming from the Bible to present-day ways of thinking.

1 Kings – J. Robinson

The plan of this volume of commentary on the New English Bible text of the First Book of Kings follows the pattern of the now well-established series on the Old and New Testaments. The main divisions of the text are those provided by the New English Bible itself, but these are further subdivided for the purposes of the commentary, which is printed in short sections following the relevant portion of the text. Canon Robinson suggests that the editors of I Kings compiled their history in order to teach the Hebrews that their existence as Israel, the covenant people of God, depended upon their continuing loyalty to their own religious traditions, and their refusal to exchange them for the very different traditions of the Canaanites among whom they lived.

2 Kings – J. Robinson

As in the other Cambridge Bible Commentary volumes, an introduction is followed by the text of the New English Bible translation divided into sections. Each section of the text is followed by the commentary upon it. Canon Robinson shows that 2 Kings is truly a continuation of the story told in the preceding historical books. The narrative now passes to the decline of the kingdoms of Israel and Judah and their territorial absorption into the empires of Assyria and Babylon. The compilers of 2 Kings attributed this downfall to the Hebrews’ disregard of the prophets and of the covenant with God.

1-2 Chronicles – R. J. Coggins

The Chronicles, divided into two books purely for convenience, have long suffered from neglect; this is partly because much of their content can be found elsewhere in the Old Testament and partly because their presentation, emphasizing genealogies and ritual ceremonies, has lacked appeal for modern man over the last few hundred years. Yet these books, with their theological interpretation of historical events, are a valuable source of illumination about the Judaean community living under Persian rule about 350 B.C. and its special relationship with Jerusalem and its temple and with God. In his introductory section, Mr Cog ,ins discusses the probable origins and the nature and purpose of ‘the Chronicler’s’ work (whether that of a single writer or a group) and then examines each book separately. In the established style of the series the N.E.B. translation of the text then follows, divided into brief sections and alternating with passages of commentary. The results of recent Old Testament scholarship and modern theological thought are conveyed in simple language to the student and layman.

Job – Norman C. Habel

Psalms 1-50 – J. W. Rogerson and J. W. McKay

This volume follows the general pattern of the series, opening with a discussion of content, of authorship, and of the way the collection came to be put together, followed by a psalm-by-psalm presentation of the NEB text with commentary. Dr Rogerson and Dr McKay stress the richness and variety of the material in the Psalms, and provide an analytical table of the predominant themes. They discuss the literary characteristics of Hebrew poetry with special reference to devices such as the acrostic, and examine the problems faced by the NEB translators. Over the years many different approaches have been made to the interoperation of the Psalms. The authors characterize these as the spiritual, the historical, the form-critical and the cultic approach, and their own commentary strikes an effective balance between them. One of their primary purposes is to bring out the religious teaching of permanent value within the Psalms.

Psalms 51-100 – J.W. Rogerson

This volume follows the general pattern of the series, opening with a discussion of content, of authorship and of the way the collection came to be put together, followed by a psalm-by-psalm presentation of the N.E.B. text with commentary.

Psalms 101-150 – John W. Rogerson, J.W. McKay

This volume follows the general pattern of the series, opening with a discussion of content, of authorship, and of the way the collection came to be put together, followed by a psalm-by-psalm presentation of the New English Bible text with commentary. Dr Rogerson and Dr McKay stress the richness and variety of the material in the Psalms, and provide an analytical table of the predominant themes. They discuss the literary characteristics of Hebrew poetry with special reference to devices such as the acrostic, and examine the problems faced by the New English Bible translators. Over the years many different approaches have been made to the interpretation of the Psalms. The authors characterize these as the spiritual, the historical, the form-critical and the cultic approaches, and their own commentary strikes an effective balance between them. One of their primary purposes is to bring out the religious teaching that is of permanent value within the Psalms.

Proverbs – R.N. Whybray

Dr Whybray’s volume, like the others in the series, contains the text in the New English Bible translation, with introductory material preceding, and a commentary directly following, each section of text. Dr Whybray describes the ancient Near Eastern tradition of producing collections of ‘wisdom’: instructions in the form of aphorisms and proverbs, for the education of the young for a happy and successful career. He indicates the dependence of Proverbs on this tradition, but also points out how the Israelite authors modified it. The book contains three kinds of material: sections whose form and character are hardly distinguishable from the instructions of Egypt and Mesopotamia; others where, in spite of a more specifically Israelite dress, the aim remains the achievement of a successful life; and finally passages in which the main purpose has now become the pursuit of a wisdom conforming entirely with the ‘fear of the Lord’.

Isaiah 1-39

In Isaiah 1-39 are included the oracles of a prophet who lived in the closing half of the eighth century B.C. His interest in contemporary politics and understanding of international affairs was the product of his faith in the Holy God, who rules in and over all history. Professor Herbert introduces the book with sections on its date, context, nature and content. The text is then given with the detailed commentary in the style now established for this series.

Isaiah 40-66

Chapters 40-66 of the Book of the Prophet Isaiah, addressed to the Jews in exile in Babylon, belong to a period from about 547 BC when Babylonian power was weakening before the might of King Cyrus of Persia. Isaiah not only saw this as the will of God, but asserted that God was directing events in order that Yahweh’s people might be released from exile. The quality of the earlier chapters in particular resulted from his conviction that it was his task to prepare the exiles for their new role and to restore their faith and confidence. The first volume of Professor Herbert’s commentary on Isaiah, dealing with chapters 1-39, was published in 1973. In this second volume, Professor Herbert again introduces the text with a discussion of its nature, form and composition and historical setting. The N.E.B. translation of the text then follows, alternating with sections of commentary in the style now established for this series.

Jeremiah, Chapters 1-25 – Ernest W. Nicholson

Dr Nicholson’s commentary on Jeremiah will occupy two volumes. The first deals with chapters 1-25 and also contains an introduction. This introduction surveys the historical background to the life and prophetic ministry of the prophet during the last decades of the kingdom of Judah. In a further section the composition of the book is discussed and this is followed by an outline of its dominant religious ideas. The main body of the volume, in the style now established for this series, gives the text, divided into brief sections, and alternating with sections of commentary. The results of recent Old Testament scholarship and modern theological thought are conveyed to the student and the layman in simple language. Chapters 26 onwards will be covered in a second volume.

Jeremiah, Chapters 26-52 – Ernest W. Nicholson

The first volume of Dr Nicholson’s commentary on Jeremiah, dealing with chapters 1-25, was published in 1973. In this second volume, continuing from chapter 26 onwards, Dr Nicholson again introduces the text with a survey of the historical background to the life and ministry of the prophet during the last decades of the Kingdom of Judah, and discusses the composition of the book, giving an outline of its dominant religious ideas. The main body of the volume, in the integrated style now established for this series, contains the New English Bible translation of the text, divided into brief sections, alternating with sections of commentary. The results of recent Old Testament scholarship and modern theological thought are conveyed in simple language to the student and layman.

Ezekiel – Keith W. Carley

The prophet Ezekiel, in exile from the land of Judah ,came, to see the reason for his country’s downfall, and prophesied its eventual restoration with the revival of faith and moral responsibility. This visionary book is often difficult to understand. Dr Carley’s commentary makes its meaning available to the modern reader, particularly by explaining the historical context. When so explained, the book has a relevance still for people looking for meanings in a time of national and moral crisis.

Daniel – Raymond Hammer

The Book of Daniel was compiled in the second century B.C.; as we have it, it is written partly in Hebrew and partly in Aramaic. The first part contains stories about Daniel, a Jewish exile in the Babylonian captivity, and his companions. The later chapters consist of an account of visions granted by God to Daniel. Canon Hammer’s commentary shows that the book carries a message of hope to those who live in the faith. This volume contains an introduction dealing with the background and content of the book, following the pattern set by other commentaries in the series. A section-by-section presentation of the New English Bible text with commentary follows.

Amos, Hosea, Micah – Henry McKeating

The plan of this volume of commentary on the New English Bible text of three Old Testament books follows the pattern established by the New Testament series of Cambridge Bible Commentaries on the New English Bible. The main divisions of the text are those provided by the New English Bible itself. The text is further subdivided for the purposes of the commentary, which is printed in short sections following the relevant portion of text. In his introduction Dr. McKeating discusses the chronology of the books in this volume, indicating briefly the historical events of the period. He examines the structure and content of these books and shows how these three men, alike in their intensity but utterly different in background and in temperament, reflect three different attitudes to a corrupt society.

Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah – John D.W. Watts

The six Old Testament books dealt with in this volume of the Commentary are part of a larger unit originally copied on one scroll and called, for the sake of simplicity, the books of the twelve or minor prophets. The prophetic visions, liturgies and oracles contained in the twelve books were collected over a period of more than 300 years and given their final shape not earlier than the middle of the fifth century BC. In his opening chapter Dr Watts provides the historical and liturgical background to the books and discusses the nature and role of prophecy in worship. In the style established for the series, the NEB translation of the text then follows, divided into brief sections alternating with sections of commentary. The results of Old Testament scholarship and modern theological though are conveyed to the student and the layman in simple language.

Haggai Zechariah and Malachi – Rex Mason

As in other volumes of the Cambridge Bible Commentary, there are introductions to the books dealt with, followed by the text of the New English Bible divided into sections. Each section of the text is followed by the commentary upon it. The preaching of the prophets Haggai and Zechariah gave a new impetus to the life of the ‘remnant’ of the Jewish people returned from the Babylonian exile. Haggai stresses the importance of the relationship to God of the community as a whole, while Zechariah is seen as a prophet of hope, promising Yahweh’s salvation to his people. Dr Mason considers Malachi, dating perhaps from a little later than the other two, a fitting conclusion to the group of prophetic books, in that it reminds its readers of the role of the prophets in preparing the people for God’s coming, that they might enjoy salvation rather than suffer punitive judgement.

Matthew – Aubrey W. Argyle

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or a few short books, of the Bible, and in each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references, but the commentary does convey the latest and best scholarship. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. In addition to the general introductory volume, Understanding the New Testament, there is a volume of maps and plates, New Testament Illustrations.

Mark – C.F.D. Moule

This volume on Mark’s Gospel is one of the series of commentaries on the New English Bible designed for use in schools and training colleges, and for the layman. Each volume will comment on one book, or two or three short books, of the Bible, beginning with the New Testament, already published. In each the text will be given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care is being taken to see that the commentary is suitable to the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references, but the commentary does convey the latest and best scholarship. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. There will also be a general introductory volume, Understanding the New Testament, and a volume of maps and plates, The New Testament Illustrated.

Luke

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or a few short books, of the Bible, and in each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references, but the commentary does convey the latest and best scholarship. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults.

John – A. M. Hunter

This volume on John’s Gospel is one of the series of commentaries on the New English Bible which is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or a few short books, of the Bible, and in each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references, but the commentary does convey the latest and best scholarship. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. In addition to the general introductory volume, Understanding the New Testament, there is a volume of maps and plates, New Testament Illustrations.

Acts of Apostles – edited by J.W. Packer

This is a series of commentaries on the New English Bible designed for use in schools and training colleges, and for the layman. It replaces the old Cambridge Bible for Schools. Each volume will comment on one book, or two or three short books, of the Bible, beginning with the New Testament, already published. In each the text will be given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care is being taken to see that the commentary is suitable to the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references, but the commentary does convey the latest and best scholarship. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. It is hoped to have the series complete in a few years. There will also be a general introductory volume, Understanding the New Testament, and a volume of maps and plates, The New Testament Illustrated.

Romans – Ernest Best

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or part, of the Bible. In each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. Commentaries on all the books of the Old Testament, New Testament and Apocrypha have been published, together with introductory volumes and books of illustrations to accompany each Testament.

I and II Corinthians

This is a series of commentaries on the New English Bible designed for use in schools and training colleges, and for the layman. It replaces the old Cambridge Bible for Schools. Each volume will comment on one book, or two or three short books, of the Bible, beginning with the New Testament, already published. In each the text will be given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references, but the commentary does convey the latest and best scholarship. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in schools and working with adults. It is hoped to have the series complete in a few years. There will also be a general introductory volume, Understanding the New Testament, and a volume of maps and plates, The New Testament Illustrated.

Galatians – Williams Neil

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or part, of the Bible. In each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. Commentaries on all the books of the Old Testament, New Testament and Apocrypha have been published, together with introductory volumes and books of illustrations to accompany each Testament.

Ephesians, Colossians, Philemon – G. H. P. Thompson

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or part, of the Bible. In each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. Commentaries on all the books of the Old Testament, New Testament and Apocrypha have been published, together with introductory volumes and books of illustrations to accompany each Testament.

Philippians, Thessalonians – K. Grayston

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or part, of the Bible. In each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of Biblical references. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. Commentaries on all the books of the Old Testament, New Testament and Apocrypha have been published, together with introductory volumes and books of illustrations to accompany each Testament.

Pastoral Letters – A. T. Hanson

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or part, of the Bible. In each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. Commentaries on all the books of the Old Testament, New Testament and Apocrypha have been published, together with introductory volumes and books of illustrations to accompany each Testament.

The Letters of John and James – R. R. Williams

This is a series of commentaries on the New English Bible designed for use in schools and training colleges, and for the layman. It replaces the old Cambridge Bible for Schools. Each volume will comment on one book, or two or three short books, of the Bible, beginning with the New Testament, already published. In each the text will be given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care is being taken to see that the commentary is suitable to the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references, but the commentary does convey the latest and best scholarship. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. It is hoped to have the series complete in a few years. There will also be a general introductory volume, Understanding the New Testament, and a volume of maps and plates, The New Testament Illustrated.

The Letters of Peter and Jude – A.R. Leaney

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or part, of the Bible. In each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. Commentaries on all the books of the Old Testament, New Testament and Apocrypha have been published, together with introductory volumes and books of illustrations to accompany each Testament.

A Letter to Hebrews – J. H. Davies

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or part, of the Bible. In each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. Commentaries on all the books of the Old Testament, New Testament and Apocrypha have been published, together with introductory volumes and books of illustrations to accompany each Testament.

The Revelation of John – T.F. Glasson

This series of commentaries on the New English Bible is designed for use in schools and colleges, and for the minister and the layman. Each volume comments on one book, or part, of the Bible. In each the text is given in full. Sections of text and commentary alternate, so that the reader does not have to keep two books open, or turn from one part of the book to the other, or refer to a commentary in small type at the foot of the page. Great care has been taken to see that the commentary is suitable for the student and the layman: there is no Greek or Hebrew, and no strings of biblical references. The general editors all have experience of teaching or examining in school and working with adults. Commentaries on all the books of the Old Testament, New Testament and Apocrypha have been published, together with introductory volumes and books of illustrations to accompany each Testament.


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