Crossway Classic Commentaries | Reviews, Theology

Crossway Classic Commentaries are classic reference works and study aids written by Christian pastors and scholars from Church history. The text has been modified to align with modern English, so that modern-day readers can understand the explanations, insights, and applications easier. The publisher, and fans of the series, believe that these works should not only be preserved, but read and considered by Christians today.

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Crossway Classic Commentaries: Reviews

Crossway Classics CommentaryFrom the publisher:

“For hundreds of years Christendom has been blessed with Bible commentaries written by great men of God highly respected for their godly walk and their insight into spiritual truth. The Crossway Classic Commentaries present the very best work on individual Bible books, carefully adapted for maximum understanding and usefulness for today’s believers.

Perhaps there is no clearer and more systematic treatise on the gospel of Jesus Christ than that found in Paul’s Epistle to the Romans. Christian believers through the centuries have fed deeply on its themes of the sinfulness of man, the richness of God’s mercy, the transforming power of Jesus Christ in the repentant life, the believer’s participation in the Savior’s death and resurrection, and the practical implications of spiritual truth for daily life.

This classic commentary is a treasure for all who desire a deeper walk with God. Whether used for supplementary reading or for careful study, it will prove profitable to every follower of Christ who avails himself or herself of its gems.”

Volumes in the Crossway Classic Commentary Series

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Genesis – John Calvin

The wisdom of the ages can still be read in the Crossway Classic Commentaries, which present the very best all-time commentaries on individual books of the Bible. In this newest release, John Calvin explores key passages of Genesis—a book of important beginnings and memorable accounts that lays the foundation of Christianity. Carefully abridged and stylistically adapted for today’s reader, Calvin’s insights are an excellent guide for every student interested in fathoming the depths of the Bible’s first book.

Psalms – C.H. Spurgeon

This book and its companion volume share the practical encouragement from a favorite Bible book. Charles H. Spurgeon spent twenty years compiling his seven-volume exposition of Psalms, which Crossway has carefully edited for the modern reader.

Proverbs – Charles Bridges

A country clergyman who became a scholar, CHARLES BRIDGES (1794–1869) was well known as a prominent leader of the Evangelical Party in the Church of England. He is best remembered for his Old Testament commentaries and The Christian Ministry, his 1829 treatise on pastoral ministry that remains influential today.

Isaiah – John Calvin

Rich imagery and glimpses of God’s character abound in the book of Isaiah. Even as the prophet cried out against Judah’s empty idolatry and warned of the judgment they would receive, he stressed God’s holiness, patience, and mercy. Redemption is Isaiah’s central theme, evidenced in his declarations about Judah’s temporal need for salvation—and every soul’s eternal one. Consequently Isaiah, more than any other prophet, foretold the coming of the Messiah and all that would follow.

Jeremiah and Lamentations – John Calvin

Writing as if closely acquainted with the prophet, John Calvin explains Jeremiah’s emphasis on God’s mercy and kindness toward His chosen but erring people. Just as Jeremiah looked forward to the future messianic kingdom, Calvin’s enthusiasm never wanes as he applies the prophet’s teachings to both the church and individual Christians.

Matthew – J. C. Ryle

Matthew is a fascinating treatment of the first Gospel. Well exegeted, accompanied by encouraging practical application, this helpful volume shares the power of God’s promises fulfilled in God-become-man, Jesus Christ. Familiar passages come alive in the exposition given by a great man of faith; new gems of understanding and vision fuel heart-felt worship and new commitment for holy living.

Mark – J. C. Ryle

Mark is a dynamic discussion of the second Gospel. Here is all the excitement and fervor of this action-packed biography of our precious Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ. Familiar and not-so-familiar passages bring deep encouragement and powerful vision, leading to inner renewal and holier living.

Luke – J.C. Ryle

Luke is an encouraging treatment of the third Gospel—the life of Christ as told by “the beloved physician” under the direction of God’s Spirit. The teachings and miracles of our Savior come to life in a powerful way, producing deeper devotion and increased commitment in the hearts of those who follow the Master.

John – John Calvin

The Gospel of John, called “the spiritual gospel” in early church history, is among the most profound books of the New Testament. A powerful portrayal of the earthly life and ministry of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, it explores precious tenets of the faith—Christ’s nature, His reasons for coming to earth, His determination to fulfill the Father’s will by giving His own life for us, the splendor of His miracles, the supremacy of His love.

Acts – John Calvin

John Calvin’s insightful examination of this action-packed, fast-paced section of Scripture will give serious Bible students a solid grip on the key passages and themes of Acts. And that in turn will give believers renewed enthusiasm and boldness in taking the good news of Christ to their own time and setting.

Romans – Charles Hodge

Perhaps there is no clearer and more systematic treatise on the gospel of Jesus Christ than that found in Paul’s Epistle to the Romans. Christian believers through the centuries have fed deeply on its themes of the sinfulness of man, the richness of God’s mercy, the transforming power of Jesus Christ in the repentant life, the believer’s participation in the Savior’s death and resurrection, and the practical implications of spiritual truth for daily life.

I Corinthians – Charles Hodge

The apostle Paul’s epistles to the church at Corinth are masterpieces of spiritual truth applied to crises within the church—crises of both belief and practice. In his first letter Paul gives the Corinthian believers an honest inventory of their spiritual strengths and weaknesses—fully gifted and yet divided; believing foundational Gospel truth and yet condoning immorality and doctrinal distortions—and urges them to fully commit themselves to Christ.

2 Corinthians – Charles Hodge

The apostle Paul’s epistles to the church at Corinth are masterpieces of spiritual truth applied to crises within the church—crises of both belief and practice. In his second letter to the Corinthians, the most personal and heart-wrenchingly honest of all of his epistles, Paul commends the value of earthly trials—God’s power at work in our weakness; inner renewal despite outward suffering; eternal treasures—and resoundingly testifies to God’s faithfulness in adversity.

Galatians – Martin Luther

Ever since it was written, the apostle Paul’s letter to the believers in Galatia has nurtured trust and assurance in Christ. Its grand themes of the superiority of Scripture over human reason, the sufficiency of Christ’s atonement through his death, and the freedom of justification through faith alone continue to energize and enlighten Christians today.

Ephesians – Charles Hodge

The apostle Paul’s epistle to the Ephesian Christians has long brought spiritual encouragement to God’s people. The abundance of our spiritual resources in Christ; salvation by grace through faith, not through works; heavenly exhortations for Christian families on earth; an inventory of the weapons God provides for spiritual battle—these and other themes bring joy to believers’ hearts.

Philippians – J. B. Lightfoot

Many Christians consider the apostle Paul’s letter to the Philippians a special treasure. Its grand themes of spiritual joy and vitality, the self-humbling Savior who gave his life for us, the good news of a salvation that is superior to the boastings of the flesh—these and other gems still nurture followers of Jesus Christ today.

Colossians and Philemon – J. B Lightfoot

Christians throughout the centuries have marveled at the spiritual treasures in the apostle Paul’s letters to the Colossians and to Philemon. Grand themes of the supremacy of Christ, the superiority of the Gospel over false belief systems, the joy of setting one’s focus on things above, and the love-bonds between all followers of the Savior continue to inspire Christians today.

1-2 Thessalonians – John Calvin

Forced out of Thessalonica by the Jews for his effective ministry, Paul wrote to encourage and teach the new believers there. Within his first letter, according to John Calvin, is a brief definition of true Christianity. It is a faith that is full of vigor, employing itself in the labors of love, intent upon the hope of the manifestation of Christ, despising everything else, and armed with an endurance that rises above the wearisomeness of time and worldly temptations. Paul’s second epistle then expands upon and clarifies some of his teachings from the first letter.

1 and 2 Timothy and Titus – John Calvin

Timothy and Titus were two of Paul’s faithful associates. When problems arose in a church, Paul knew he could depend on either one of them to handle the situation. In these three epistles Paul encourages his younger colleagues in their roles as pastors. He advises them on worship, leadership, integrity issues, and generation gaps. With confidence the aging apostle passes the torch of faith and exhorts them to be Christ’s representatives on earth. John Calvin’s exploration of the key passages of these three pastoral epistles not only provides historical insight into the early church, but also guidance and encouragement for pastors and lay leaders today.

Hebrews – John Owen

The author of Hebrews wanted his audience to know and understand one truth: Christ is superior, and therefore, so is Christianity. He demonstrates this by comparing the imperfect old covenant with the perfect new covenant. The person of Christ is better than prophets and angels, His priesthood is greater than that of Melchizedek and the line of Aaron, and His power within the believer’s life is incomparable. Between these contrasts he exhorts the readers to persevere in their faith, be obedient, grow in their understanding, and not miss the grace of God. The lessons and admonitions of Hebrews have intensely practical application for all readers—then and now.

James – Thomas Manton

The epistle of James abounds with punch and clarity. Amazingly relevant and practical for our age, it continues to be a popular New Testament book for followers of Christ. Its themes, which include good works issuing out of genuine faith, equal treatment of the rich and poor, taming the tongue, heavenly wisdom, and patience in the midst of suffering, have brought great encouragement to God’s people.

1 and 2 Peter – Robert Leighton

Addressed to persecuted believers, Peter’s first letter encourages them with the knowledge that it is possible to live victoriously in the midst of hostility—just as Christ, who suffered unjustly, did. He exhorts them to live a holy life that they might be a witness and evangelize the world through their faithfulness. In his second epistle, Peter warns against the more subtle dangers from within the church—false teachers and errant doctrine. He also emphasizes the importance of scriptural knowledge, for only in understanding true doctrine will heresies be known and immoral behavior be exposed.

1, 2, 3 John – John Calvin and Matthew Henry

John’s epistles have enriched and equipped followers of Christ down through the centuries. The themes—such as walking in the truth, acknowledging our proneness to sin, being wary of the lies of antichrist, and denying ourselves the empty enticements of the world—continue to be invaluable for the people of God.

Jude – Thomas Manton

Jude devoted his epistle exclusively to confronting those who had defected from the true biblical faith and the false teachers who had led them astray. Revealing the character of these godless men who changed the grace of God into a license for immorality, Jude calls the church to discernment. He also encourages the believers to persevere in the faith with prayer and the knowledge that the wicked will be punished.

Revelation – Matthew Henry

No other New Testament book poses more serious and difficult interpretative challenges than Revelation. Full of vivid imagery and striking symbolism, the church is ultimately reminded of God’s sovereignty to accomplish His purposes regardless of any opposition. The Lamb of God will be the victor in the moral and spiritual conflict of the ages. This eschatological book portrays the last battle of human history, the career and defeat of the antichrist, Christ’s millennial reign, and His judgment of the wicked and the righteous. The apostle John’s vision of the glorified Christ and the last times both exhorts and instructs believers. With Henry’s classic insights and exploration of Revelation’s key passages, this commentary is especially relevant for today’s reader.