Seek First the Kingdom of God: What Does Matthew 6:33 Mean?


Matthew 6:33, “But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you.” King James Version (KJV)

TranslationMatthew 6:33
ESVBut seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.
NASB“But seek first His kingdom and His righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.
NIVBut seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well.
NLTSeek the Kingdom of God above all else, and live righteously, and he will give you everything you need.

Seek First the Kingdom of God: Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary

6:25-34 There is scarcely any sin against which our Lord Jesus more warns his disciples, than disquieting, distracting, distrustful cares about the things of this life. This often insnares the poor as much as the love of wealth does the rich.

But there is a carefulness about temporal things which is a duty, though we must not carry these lawful cares too far. Take no thought for your life. Not about the length of it; but refer it to God to lengthen or shorten it as he pleases; our times are in his hand, and they are in a good hand.

Not about the comforts of this life; but leave it to God to make it bitter or sweet as he pleases. Food and raiment God has promised, therefore we may expect them. Take no thought for the morrow, for the time to come.

Be not anxious for the future, how you shall live next year, or when you are old, or what you shall leave behind you. As we must not boast of tomorrow, so we must not care for to-morrow, or the events of it. God has given us life, and has given us the body.

And what can he not do for us, who did that? If we take care about our souls and for eternity, which are more than the body and its life, we may leave it to God to provide for us food and raiment, which are less. Improve this as an encouragement to trust in God.

We must reconcile ourselves to our worldly estate, as we do to our stature. We cannot alter the disposals of Providence, therefore we must submit and resign ourselves to them. Thoughtfulness for our souls is the best cure of thoughtfulness for the world.

Seek first the kingdom of God, and make religion your business: say not that this is the way to starve; no, it is the way to be well provided for, even in this world.

The conclusion of the whole matter is, that it is the will and command of the Lord Jesus, that by daily prayers we may get strength to bear us up under our daily troubles, and to arm us against the temptations that attend them, and then let none of these things move us.

Happy are those who take the Lord for their God, and make full proof of it by trusting themselves wholly to his wise disposal. Let thy Spirit convince us of sin in the want of this disposition, and take away the worldliness of our hearts.

Matthew 6:33 | Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

33. But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you—This is the great summing up.

Strictly speaking, it has to do only with the subject of the present section—the right state of the heart with reference to heavenly and earthly things; but being couched in the form of a brief general directory, it is so comprehensive in its grasp as to embrace the whole subject of this discourse.

And, as if to make this the more evident, the two keynotes of this great sermon seem purposely struck in it—”the KINGDOM” and “the RIGHTEOUSNESS” of the kingdom—as the grand objects, in the supreme pursuit of which all things needful for the present life will be added to us.

The precise sense of every word in this golden verse should be carefully weighed. “The kingdom of God” is the primary subject of the Sermon on the Mount—that kingdom which the God of heaven is erecting in this fallen world, within which are all the spiritually recovered and inwardly subject portion of the family of Adam, under Messiah as its Divine Head and King.

“The righteousness thereof” is the character of all such, so amply described and variously illustrated in the foregoing portions of this discourse. The “seeking” of these is the making them the object of supreme choice and pursuit; and the seeking of them “first” is the seeking of them before and above all else.

The “all these things” which shall in that case be added to us are just the “all these things” which the last words of Mt 6:32 assured us “our heavenly Father knoweth that we have need of”; that is, all we require for the present life.

And when our Lord says they shall be “added,” it is implied, as a matter of course, that the seekers of the kingdom and its righteousness shall have these as their proper and primary portion: the rest being their gracious reward for not seeking them. What follows is but a reduction of this great general direction into a practical and ready form for daily use.

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