Whatever You Ask In My Name: What Does John 14:13 Mean?


John 14:13 reads, “And whatsoever ye shall ask in my name, that will I do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son.” King James Version (KJV)

TranslationJohn 14:13
ESVWhatever you ask in my name, this I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son.
NASB“Whatever you ask in My name, that will I do, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son.
NIVAnd I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son.
NLTYou can ask for anything in my name, and I will do it, so that the Son can bring glory to the Father.

Whatever You Ask In My Name: Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary

14:12-17 Whatever we ask in Christ’s name, that shall be for our good, and suitable to our state, he shall give it to us. To ask in Christ’s name, is to plead his merit and intercession, and to depend upon that plea.

The gift of the Spirit is a fruit of Christ’s mediation, bought by his merit, and received by his intercession. The word used here, signifies an advocate, counsellor, monitor, and comforter.

He would abide with the disciples to the end of time; his gifts and graces would encourage their hearts. The expressions used here and elsewhere, plainly denote a person, and the office itself includes all the Divine perfections.

The gift of the Holy Ghost is bestowed upon the disciples of Christ, and not on the world. This is the favour God bears to his chosen. As the source of holiness and happiness, the Holy Spirit will abide with every believer for ever.

John 14:13 | Poole Bible Commentary

The whatsoever, in this text, must be limited by what the will of God hath revealed in other texts, as to the matter of our prayers;

viz. they must be things that are for our good; such things as we stand in need of, and as God hath given us a liberty to ask: and indeed no other things can be asked in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ; for to ask in Christ’s name,

signifieth not only the making use of his sacred name in our prayers, (though the constant practice of the church in prayer,

hath evidenced it the general opinion of divines, that this is a part of the sense), but also in asking for his merits, and such things as shall be conformable to his will, and for his glory. Whatsoever (saith he) you shall ask of this nature, I will do.

He doth not say, my Father will do, but I will do it; to testify his Divine power, and oneness in power with his Father.

That the Father may be glorified in the Son: God hath set up his rest in Christ, and will be glorified in and through him; and hath therefore given him all power in heaven and earth.

Recent Posts