Wycliffe Exegetical Commentaries (WEC) | Reviews, Theology

The Wycliffe Exegetical Commentary series is a bible resource reference collection, which included multiple well-reviewed volumes, before it was discontinued. The WEC series first appeared in the 1980’s, and when it was discontinued by the publisher, Moody Press, Baker adopted the New Testament potion of the series, which today is called the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (BECNT).

One of the most highly-praised volumes was Douglas Moo’s Romans 1-8 commentary, but Baker assigned scholar Tom Schreiner to write Romans for the BECNT series, so Moo later published his entire Romans commentary in the NICNT series. Robert Thomas’ Revelation volume in the WEC series is considered by many to be one of the top technical commentaries on Revelation written from a dispensational perspective.

Note: Please see how the WEC series compares to dozens of other commentary series on the Bible Commentaries Comparison Chart.

Purpose of the Wycliffe Exegetical Commentary Series (WEC)

Wycliffe Exegetical CommentrayAn Exegetical Commentary. Written especially for the informed layman, student, and scholar, all exegesis and exposition is based on the original languages of the Bible books. Translations used are those of the author. Textual criticism and word study are included where appropriate.

This in-depth commentary also includes extended excursuses on important topics of theological, historical, and archaeological interest. The text is interpreted according to a historical, critical, grammatical hermeneutic and propounds a conservative, evangelical theology. But the reader will not get a narrow view of problem passages. This commentary interacts with a range of major views, both evangelical and nonevangelical.

Volumes in the Wycliffe Exegetical Commentary Series

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Numbers – R.K. Harrison

Harrison later published his Numbers commentary with Baker. R. K. Harrison was one of the leading evangelical Old Testament scholars of the twentieth century. Well known for his Introduction to the Old Testament and his work as general editor of the New International Commentary on the Old Testament series, he also produced several valuable commentaries. In this volume, he applies his considerable skills to interpreting the book of Numbers, the fourth book of the Pentateuch.

Joel, Amos, Obadiah – Thomas J. Finley

Thomas J. Finley is chair of the department of Old Testament and Semitics and professor emeritus of Old Testament and Semitics at the Talbot School of Theology of Biola University in La Mirada, California.

Habakkuk, Zephaniah – Richard D. Patterson

Dr. Richard Patterson holds an (A.B., Wheaton College; M.Div., Northwest Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.M. Talbot Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles) In his years of service he has been Professor at Grand Rapids Baptist Theological Seminary, and Northwest Baptist Seminary; Professor and Chairman of Biblical Studies at Los Angeles Baptist College and Seminary; and Professor, Chairman of Biblical Studies, and Dean of Graduate Studies at Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary. The latter also honored Dr. Patterson with Distinguished Professor Emeritus in 1994.

Romans 1-8 – Douglas Moo and Kenneth L. Barker

Moo later published his entire Romans commentary in the NICNT series.

Philippians – Moises Silva

Silva later published his entire Philippians commentary in the BECNT series.

Revelation – Robert Thomas: 2 Volumes

Written especially for the informed layman, student, and scholar, this commentary seeks to clear the air. The book is interpreted according to a historical and grammatical hermeneutic and propounds a conservative, evangelical theology, but the reader will not get a narrow view on areas of disagreement. This commentary interacts with a range of major views, both evangelical and nonevangelical. It reaffirms the basic framework of eschatology espoused by ancient Christianity, but with added help from centuries of maturing thought and doctrinal progress in the Body of Christ.